Toad BOOK LOOK #2: Tadpole Habitat + The Adventures of Old Mr. Toad (Annotated)

Where do you find those awesome toad egg strands?

I’ve had the most success finding toad egg strands for the past few years along the edges of our river once it becomes more shallow in mid-May and all the way through mid-June.

Often there are also side streams of water that form channels and large puddles and if the toads time it just right they can lay their egg strands, have the tadpoles hatch, and become toadlets all before the water dries up in the heat of the summer.

P.L.A.Y. Adventure – Curiosity Time – Part #1

  • Where are there toads, or frogs, in your area? How would you know?
  • Depending on the time of year you’ll need to be looking AND listening.
  • If you’re not sure, check out some resource guides for your local area and then plan a field trip to visit where toads hang out near you! You’re in for a toad-ally awesome treasure treat!

HINT: Be a patient observer and take your time looking along the water’s edge as often the toad egg strands are a bit camouflaged by the silty sand that has collected on them (unless they are freshly hatched strands!)

Where and when can you look for actual toad tadpoles?

P.L.A.Y. Adventure Time – Part #2

The tadpoles near to where I live in Massachusetts hatch in the water at the very end of May in late spring and continue to grow throughout the summer until late August when they change into toadlets and then exit the water heading for the woods as autumn approaches.

Visit this PINTEREST video HERE to see what key nature pieces need to be in place to make a suitable tadpole home (habitat) outdoors. Make a list of what you see by getting curious and asking questions:

  • Is the water moving or still?
  • What is on the bottom of the water area?
  • What is surrounding the pool of water?
  • Is it shaded or sunny?

Time to take a walk in the woods or in a local nature park on trails to see if you can spy the tadpole habitat near your home. And be sure to continue getting curious and ask even more questions:

  • What temperature is the air?
  • What temperature is the water?
  • Are the tadpoles actively swimming or sitting still?
  • What other animals are in the water? Salamanders? Snails? Small Fish?
  • Are their any bird or animal tracks near the water’s edge suggesting there are visitors?
  • What else did you observe? Record it!

 ~ ~ ~ BOOK LOOK ~ ~ ~


The Adventures of Old Mr. Toad (Annotated):

A P.L.A.Y. Nature Activity Story Book 

by Karen L. Willard

Join Peter Rabbit and friends on adventures discovering all about Old Mr. Toad and his days spent in and out of the water!

See sample story pages + purchase HERE

More Tadpoles + Toads in motion at PINTEREST HERE.