Deer BOOK LOOK – Chapter 7 – A Startling New Hoofprint

Original story written in 1921 by Thornton Burgess and revised by P.L.A.Y. for the 21st century family.

– Chapter 7 –

A Startling New Hoofprint


The game of hide-and-seek between Lightfoot the Deer and the beautiful newcomer whose dainty hoofprints had first started Lightfoot to seeking her had been going on for several days and nights when Lightfoot found something which gave him a shock. He had gone very softly down to the Laughing Brook, hoping to surprise the beautiful newcomer drinking there. She wasn’t to be seen. Lightfoot wondered if she had been there, so he looked in the mud at the edge of the Laughing Brook to see if there were any fresh prints of those dainty feet. Almost at once he discovered fresh hoofprints. However, they were not the prints he was looking for. They were not the dainty prints he had learned to know so well. They were prints very near the size of his own big ones and they had been made only a short time before.

Startling new discovery of larger hoofprints!

The finding of those prints was a dreadful shock to Lightfoot. He understood instantly what they meant. They meant that a second newcomer had come into the Green Forest, one who had antlers just like his own.

“He has come here to seek that beautiful newcomer I have been searching for,” thought Lightfoot. “He has come here to take her away from me. He has come from the Great Mountain where that beautiful newcomer must have come from, too. I want her to stay here in the Green Forest with me and I must drive this fellow out.”

Lightfoot stamped his feet and the hair on the back of his neck stood up. He threw his head high in the air and whistled angrily. Then he leaped over the Laughing Brook and once more began to search through the Green Forest. However, this time it was not for the beautiful newcomer with the dainty feet. He had no time to think of her now. He must first find this other newcomer and he meant to waste no time in doing so.

Capture your thoughts in your P.L.A.Y. Adventures nature journal!

  1. What time of day do deer move about the most?
  2. Where do the deer sleep? Do the sleep standing up or laying down?
  3. Do the males and the females form a herd together? or separate?
  4. Do deer walk over the same paths or form new paths throughout the forest?
  5. What are you curious about having read 7 chapters about Lightfoot the Deer? Capture your questions in your nature journal!

Deer tracks and scat (aka poop!) and so much more can be found in this handy guide book, Scats and Tracks of the Northeast by James C. Halfpenny, that fits easily in your backpack to take on your next P.L.A.Y. adventure in a field or forest near you!

Deer BOOK LOOK – Chapter 6 – A Game of Hide-N-Seek

Original story written in 1921 by Thornton Burgess and revised by P.L.A.Y. for the 21st century family.

– Chapter 6 –

A Game of Hide-N-Seek


Little did he know that he, Lightfoot the Deer, was playing hide-and-seek in the Green Forest. He was “it”, and some one else was doing the hiding. He was now filled with longing to find and make friends with the beautiful newcomer of whom he had just once caught a glimpse, and of whom every day he found tracks.

At times Lightfoot would get frustrated. He would stamp his feet angrily and thrash the bushes with his great spreading antlers as if they were an enemy with whom he was fighting. More than once when he did this a pair of great, soft, gentle eyes were watching him, though he didn’t know it. If he could have seen them and the look of admiration in them, he would have been more eager than ever to find that beautiful newcomer.

At other times Lightfoot would steal about through the Green Forest as noiselessly as a shadow. He would peer into thickets and behind tangles of fallen trees and brush piles, hoping to surprise the one he sought. He would be very, very patient. He had thought himself very clever until this newcomer proved herself more clever.

Of course it wasn’t long before all the critters in the Green Forest knew what was going on. They knew all about that game of hide-and-seek. And instead of trying to help Lightfoot they gave him no help at all. The fact is, they were enjoying this game. Mischievous Sammy Jay even went so far as to warn the newcomer several times when Lightfoot was approaching. Of course Lightfoot knew when Sammy did this, and each time he got very frustrated.

Once Lightfoot almost ran smack into Buster Bear who just grinned good naturedly and allowed Lightfoot to continue on his search and go bounding away.

Then there were times when Lightfoot would sulk and would declare over and over to himself, “I don’t care anything about that newcomer and I won’t spend another minute looking for her,” and then within five minutes he would be watching, listening, and seeking some sign that she was still in the Green Forest.

Signs that the newcomer is still around and playing Hide-n-Seek.

Capture your thoughts in your P.L.A.Y. Adventures nature journal!

  1. When you feel out-of-sorts or you are frustrated have you ever gone outdoors and spent time in nature to regroup? If not, give it a try!
  2. How does the sound of the wind or songs of the birds, rays of sunshine or sprinkling of rain, scent of fresh flowers or the grass between your toes feel? Does it shift your mood?
  3. Does taking a moment outdoors help you feel grounded and centered and connected to the Great World and all that Mother Nature has created?
  4. Bring your P.L.A.Y. Adventures nature journal outdoors and find a spot to simply sit and soak in all that nature has in store for you in the present moment and then try to capture it in your journal through writing, coloring, drawing, or painting. Ahhh . . . peace-filled P.L.A.Y.!

Deer BOOK LOOK – Chapter 5 – Lightfoot Sees the Newcomer

Original story written by Thornton Burgess and revised by P.L.A.Y. for the 21st century family.

– Chapter 5 –

Lightfoot Sees the Newcomer


Lightfoot the Deer was unhappy. It was a strange unhappiness, an unhappiness such as he had never known before. You see, he had discovered that there was a newcomer in the Green Forest and he knew it was another Deer. He knew it by the dainty hoofprints in the mud along the Laughing Brook and on the edge of the pond of Paddy the Beaver. He knew it by other signs which he ran across every now and then. And however much he searched he was unable to find the newcomer. He had searched everywhere and yet always he was just too late. The newcomer had come and gone.

Lightfoot felt a great longing and for the first time in his life Lightfoot felt lonely. He lost his appetite. He slept little. He roamed about uneasily, looking, listening, testing every Merry Little Breeze, and searching for the newcomer with no luck.

Then, one never-to-be-forgotten night, as he drank at the Laughing Brook, a strange feeling swept over him. It was the feeling of being watched. Lightfoot lifted his beautiful head and a slight movement caught his quick eye and drew it to a thicket not far away. The silvery light of gentle Mistress Moon fell full on that thicket in which a beautiful head in all the Great World was peeking out. For a long minute Lightfoot stood gazing. A pair of wonderful, great, soft eyes gazed back at him. Then that beautiful head disappeared.

With a mighty bound, Lightfoot cleared the Laughing Brook and rushed over to the thicket in which that beautiful head had disappeared. He plunged in and there was no one there. He searched thoroughly and yet that thicket was empty. Then he stood still and listened. Not a sound reached him. It was as still as if there were no other living things in all the Green Forest. The beautiful newcomer had slipped away as silently as a shadow.

All the rest of that night Lightfoot searched through the Green Forest with no luck. The longing to find that beautiful newcomer had become so great that he fairly ached with it. It seemed to him that until he found her he could know no happiness.

Capkin is curious to know who the newcomer is too!

Capture your thoughts in your P.L.A.Y. Adventures nature journal!

  1. Have you taken a walk in the moonlight?
  2. Was it a full moon? Half-moon? Crescent moon?
  3. Have you ever recorded the phases of the moon in your nature journal each night?
  4. If you draw the moon each night for two months, what pattern do you see?
  5. Did you know that “moonlight” is actually the sun reflecting off of the moon? The moon does not have the ability to light up on its own. Brilliant!

Deer BOOK LOOK – Chapter 4 – A Surprising Discovery

Original story written by Thornton Burgess in 1921 and revised by P.L.A.Y. for the 21st century family.

– Chapter 4 –

A Surprising Discovery


It was a beautiful late autumn in the Green Forest as Lightfoot the Deer had returned after spending his spring and summer across the Big River.

Lightfoot roamed about and it seemed to him that he could not be happier. There was plenty to eat and he began to grow sleek and fat and handsomer than ever. The days were growing colder and the frosty air made him feel good.

Just at dusk one evening he went down to his favorite drinking place at the Laughing Brook. As he put down his head to drink he saw something which so surprised him that he quite forgot he was thirsty. It was a hoofprint in the soft mud.

Hoofprint in the soft mud. Who could it be?

For a long time Lightfoot stood staring at that hoofprint. In his great, soft eyes was a look of wonder and surprise. You see, that hoofprint was exactly like one of his own, only smaller. To Lightfoot it was a very wonderful hoofprint. He was quite sure that never had he seen such a dainty hoofprint. He forgot to drink. Instead, he began to search for other hoofprints, and presently he found them. Each was as dainty as that first one.

Who could have made them? That is what Lightfoot wanted to know and what he meant to find out. It was clear to him that there was someone new in the Green Forest, and somehow he was glad. He didn’t know why, however it was true.

Lightfoot put his nose to the hoofprints and sniffed them and knew for sure he had not met this newcomer before in the forest. A great longing to find the maker of those hoofprints took hold of him. He lifted his handsome head and listened for some slight sound which might show that the newcomer was near. With his delicate nostrils he tested the wandering little Night Breezes for a stray whiff of scent to tell him which way to go. However, there was no sound and the wandering little Night Breezes told him nothing. Lightfoot followed the dainty hoofprints up the bank. There they disappeared, for the ground was hard. Lightfoot paused,
undecided which way to go.


Capture your thoughts in your P.L.A.Y. Adventures nature journal!

  1. Have you ever made tracks in the mud? How long do they last? How do they change?
  2. Have you ever seen animal tracks in the mud?
  3. How do you know who the tracks belong to?
  4. Below are two favorite books for looking up animal tracks and discovering which four-legged friends have been making trails in your neck-of-the-woods!

WILD TRACKS: A Guide to Nature’s Footprints by Jim Arnosky

This book features GIANT fold-out pages of LIFE-SIZE animal foot prints!

From deer to bear, canines to felines, small rodents to birds, this book has all the key local animal tracks covered.

Scats and Tracks of the Northeast: A Field Guide to the Signs of Seventy Wildlife Species

by James C. Halfpenny and Jim Bruchac illustrated by Todd Telander

This book fits easily in your backpack and helps you identify tracks through illustrations, a handy ruler on the back flap for measuring, and written descriptions.

This is a must have outdoor guide for folks living or visiting: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.