Toad BOOK LOOK #5: Tadpoles Hatching + The Adventures of Old Mr. Toad (Annotated)

HATCHING

“As the embryos in the egg strands elongate they move more vigorously till on the second or third day they wriggle out of the jelly string. This is the hatching and they are now free in the water and can swim about. Initially they hang themselves up on the old egg string by means of a peculiar v-shaped organ on their heads.” ~ S.H. Gage, Life History of the Toad, Cornell Nature Study Leaflet, 1904

Have you ever seen a tiny “seedling” sized tadpole?

“At first the little tadpoles remain under water all the time and breathe the air dissolved in the water, just as a fish does. As they grow larger and larger, they rush up to the surface once in awhile and then dive down again, as if their lives depended on it. The older they grow the oftener they come to the surface. This is the tadpole getting ready to breathe the free air above the water when it turns into a toad and lives on the land.” ~ S.H. Gage, Life History of the Toad, Cornell Nature Study Leaflet, 1904

This seedling size tadpole was scooped up with a handful of water and only held for a moment to take a photo before replacing back in the water.

Watch a video of this tadpole in action HERE on PINTEREST.


 ~ ~ ~ BOOK LOOK ~ ~ ~


The Adventures of Old Mr. Toad (Annotated):

A P.L.A.Y. Nature Activity Story Book 

by Karen L. Willard

Join Peter Rabbit and friends on adventures discovering all about Old Mr. Toad and his days spent in and out of the water!

See sample story pages + purchase HERE

More Tadpoles + Toads in motion at PINTEREST HERE.

Family Gardening #4: Keep Sowing Seeds to Make Seedlings!!


P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan – Time to Get Growing!



WHO?

This is all about you and your family. Time to P.L.A.Y. and Grow!

WHAT?

This week continue to sow seeds and magically make seedlings!

~ More Inspiration Below Next Photo! ~

Reminder: This series will continue to follow the seasons and growing patterns according to living here in a Zone 5 northern New England climate and you’ll need to adjust accordingly.

WHY?

P.L.A.Y. is here to encourage you and your family on your gardening journey simply by posting some of our experiences as inspiration and basic prompts to growing food and flowers.

WHERE? WHEN? HOW?

The specific gardening needs you have, including how to specifically sow and tend to seedlings, can simply be answered using your favorite search engine online seeking DIY instructions as well as library eBooks and audiobooks (especially as we are all asked to continue to P.L.A.Y. in Place at the time of this posting).

Nothing fancy required simply some containers, soil, water, seeds and sunlight!



Sowing Seeds to Magically Make SEEDLINGS!

  1. Refer to posts #1, #2, and #3 in this Family Gardening series to get up to speed on making seedlings.
  2. Start to plan where the seedlings will be planted outdoors including how much space and most ideal conditions for the types of plants you chose. With foods consider having some fencing to keep critters out and how much space you need between plants. With flowers consider if they will go in the ground or in pots and how the colors will compliment each other.
  3. While you patiently wait for the seedlings to grow and for the ground outside to be ready to receive them also consider trying more of the following ideas to engage with your family and the plant process.


Creative P.L.A.Y.-filled Connection Opportunities:

  • Suggest family members take photos or keep a garden journal to record the growing process including what seems to be working, what needs to be worked on, how things look – height, size, color, and the overall seedling process.
  • Write stories or poems or silly sentences about the seedlings and how they grew. I’ve always found it funny to call some of the seedlings “leggy” when they get too thin and tall.
  • If you have a family member that loves making calculations they can start charting how much food might be produced from a single seedling or the cost of the seeds and materials vs. the cost to purchase the food at the store. Loads of data sifting could begin now and in the future for those that are drawn to plotting and graphing things out (one of my own family members comes to mind!)
  • Start discussing recipes you might like to look up and try that make use of your garden foods as then it will be easier to jump right into the kitchen when the food ripens.


More P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan – Family Gardening HERE


This P.L.A.Y. series is an offering to ALL:

  • If you are new to gardening this series is designed to encourage you and your family to take small steps towards growing foods and flowers of any kind and any amount.
  • If you’ve tinkered with gardening in the past and things didn’t always work out this series is here to encourage you to try again AND do it as a family focusing on each individuals strengths to help it all come together.
  • This series will offer up suggestions for basic leaping off points where you and your family can begin and choose to deep dive or keep it simple in the world of gardening.
  • Most of all this series will be a source of encouragement and hopefully an inspiration to simply get in the dirt (aka garden) and P.L.A.Y. and the rest will “bee what it will bee”.

Simply BEE!

Family Gardening #3: Food + Flower Seedlings!


P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan – Time to Get Growing!



WHO?

This is all about you and your family. Time to P.L.A.Y. and Grow!

WHAT?

This week is all about making seedlings.

~ More Inspiration Below Next Photo! ~

Reminder: This series will continue to follow the seasons and growing patterns according to living here in a Zone 5 northern New England climate and you’ll need to adjust accordingly.

WHY?

P.L.A.Y. is here to encourage you and your family on your gardening journey simply by posting some of our experiences as inspiration and basic prompts to growing food and flowers.

WHERE? WHEN? HOW?

The specific gardening needs you have, including how to specifically grow and tend to seedlings, can simply be answered using your favorite search engine online seeking DIY instructions as well as library eBooks and audiobooks (especially as we are all asked to continue to P.L.A.Y. in Place at the time of this posting).

Nothing fancy required – simply some containers, soil, water, and sunlight.



PLANT the SEEDS and like magic you create SEEDLINGS!

  1. Remember those seed packets you were going to purchase last week? Great – time to take them out and make some magic!
  2. Be sure to read on the packets the exact timing for creating seedlings as you want to time it so they will be ready to plant in the ground when the conditions are right, not too soon and not too late!
  3. Now gather together some small containers or specifically little six packs like seen in these photos to add soil and plant the seeds according to the packet instructions.
  4. Create an environment where you can keep them, warm, watered, and in sunlight.
  5. Check on them daily to see their progress and tend to their needs.

Creative Connection Suggestions:

Suggest family members take photos and make notes or sketch in a garden journal to record the growing process including how things look – height, size, color, what seems to be working, what needs to be worked on, weather conditions when things move outdoors, and the overall seed to plant process.



More P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan  – Family Gardening HERE


This P.L.A.Y. series is an offering to ALL:

  • If you are new to gardening this series is designed to encourage you and your family to take small steps towards growing foods and flowers of any kind and any amount.
  • If you’ve tinkered with gardening in the past and things didn’t always work out this series is here to encourage you to try again AND do it as a family focusing on each individuals strengths to help it all come together.
  • This series will offer up suggestions for basic leaping off points where you and your family can begin and choose to deep dive or keep it simple in the world of gardening.
  • Most of all this series will be a source of encouragement and hopefully an inspiration to simply get in the dirt (aka garden) and P.L.A.Y. and the rest will “bee what it will bee”.

Simply BEE!

Bird BOOK LOOK – Chapter 5 – Robin + Bluebird


Missed Chapter 1? Begin HERE



Chapter 5 – Peter Learns Something He Hadn’t Guessed


Running over to the Old Orchard very early in the morning for a little chat with Jenny Wren and his other friends there had become a regular thing with Peter Rabbit. He was learning a great many things, and some of them were most surprising.

Two of Peter’s oldest and best friends in the Old Orchard were Winsome Bluebird and Welcome Robin. Every spring they arrived pretty nearly together, though Winsome Bluebird usually was a few days ahead of Welcome Robin. This year Winsome had arrived while the snow still lingered in patches. He was, as he always is, the herald of sweet Mistress Spring. And when Peter had heard for the first time Winsome’s soft, sweet whistle, which seemed to come from nowhere in particular and from everywhere in general, he had kicked up his long hind legs from pure joy. Then, when a few days later he had heard Welcome Robin’s joyous message of “Cheer-up! Cheer-up! Cheer-up! Cheer-up! Cheer!” from the tiptop of a tall tree, he had known that Mistress Spring really had arrived.

Peter loves Winsome Bluebird and Welcome Robin and he had known them so long and so well that he thought he knew all there was to know about them.

“Those cousins don’t look much alike, do they?” remarked Jenny Wren, as
she poked her head out of her house to chat with Peter.

“What cousins?” asked Peter, staring very hard in the direction in which Jenny Wren was looking.

“Those two sitting on the fence over there,” replied Jenny with a nod of her head.

Peter stared harder than ever. On one post sat Winsome Bluebird, and on another post sat Welcome Robin. “I don’t see anybody save Winsome and Welcome, and they are not even related,” replied Peter with a little puzzled frown.


Bluebird by Louis Agassiz Fuertes


“Tut, tut, tut!” exclaimed Jenny Wren. “They most certainly are related. They are cousins. They belong to the same family that Melody the Thrush and all the other Thrushes belong to. That makes them all cousins.”

“Really, are you sure?” inquired Peter, looking as if he didn’t believe a word of what Jenny Wren had said. Jenny repeated, and still Peter looked doubtful.

“Well, you could go ask one of them yourself,” Jenny said, and disappeared inside her house.

The more he thought of it, the more this struck Peter as good advice. So he hopped over to the foot of the fence post on which Winsome Bluebird was sitting. “Jenny Wren says that you and Welcome Robin are cousins. Are you really?” asked Peter.

Winsome chuckled. It was a soft, gentle chuckle. “Yes,” said he, nodding his head, “we are. Welcome and I may not look much alike, however we are cousins just the same. Don’t you think Welcome is looking unusually fine this spring?”

“Not a bit finer than you are yourself, Winsome,” replied Peter politely. “I just love that sky-blue coat of yours. What is the reason that Mrs. Bluebird doesn’t wear as bright a coat as you do?”

“Go ask Jenny Wren,” chuckled Winsome Bluebird, and before Peter could say another word he flew over to the roof of Farmer Brown’s house.

Back scampered Peter to tell Jenny Wren that he was sorry he had doubted her.

Then he pleaded with Jenny to tell him why it was that Mrs. Bluebird was not as brightly dressed as was Winsome.

“Mrs. Bluebird, like most mothers, is altogether too busy to spend much time taking care of her clothes; and fine clothes need a lot of care,” replied Jenny. “Besides, when Winsome is about he attracts all the attention and that gives her a chance to slip in and out of her nest without being noticed. Peter Rabbit, do you know where Winsome’s nest is?”

Peter had to admit that he did not know, although he had tried his best to find out by watching Winsome. “I think it’s over in that little house put up by Farmer Brown’s boy,” he ventured. “I saw both Mr. and Mrs. Bluebird go in it when they first came, and I’ve seen Winsome around it a great deal since, so I guess it is there.”

“Well, as a matter of fact, it is in one of those old fence posts,” said Jenny Wren. “Which one however I am not going to tell you. I will leave that for you to find out. Mrs. Bluebird certainly shows good sense and knows a good house when she sees it. The hole in that post is one of the best holes anywhere around here. It has stout walls and a doorway just big enough to get in and out of comfortably. If I had arrived here early enough I would have taken it myself. However, Mrs. Bluebird already had her nest built in it and four eggs there, so there was nothing for me to do but come over here.”

Peter nodded quite as if he understood all about the advantages of a house with walls. “That reminds me,” said he. “The other day I saw Welcome Robin getting mud and carrying it away. Pretty soon he was joined by Mrs. Robin, and she did the same thing. They kept it up till I got tired of watching them.”

“Jenny, what were they doing with that mud?” asked Peter.

“They are building their nest,” said Jenny. How they build the kind of a home they do is more than I can understand. Mr. Wren and I build our nest with just sticks and clean straws. And before I lay my eggs I see to it that my nest is lined with feathers.”

“Welcome Robin and Mrs. Robin make the foundation of their nest of mud, simply plain, common, ordinary mud. They cover this with dead grass, and sometimes there is mighty little of this over the inside walls of mud. I know because I’ve seen the inside of their nest often. More than once I’ve known them to have their nest washed away in a heavy rain, or have it blown down in a high wind. Nothing like that ever happens to Winsome Bluebird or to me.”

 


Robin by Louis Agassiz Fuertes


Jenny disappeared inside her house, and Peter waited for her to come out again. Welcome Robin, with his black head, beautiful russet breast, black and white throat and yellow bill, flew down on the ground, ran a few steps, and then stood still with his head on one side as if listening. Then he reached down and tugged at something, and presently out of the ground came a long, wriggling angleworm. Welcome gulped it down and ran on a few steps, then once more paused to listen. This time he turned and ran three or four steps to the right, where he pulled another worm out of the ground.

“He acts as if he heard those worms in the ground,” said Peter, speaking aloud without thinking.

“He does,” said Jenny Wren, poking her head out of her doorway just as Peter spoke. “How do you suppose he would find them when they are in the ground if he didn’t hear them?”

“Can you hear them?” asked Peter.

“I’ve never tried and I don’t intend to,” replied Jenny. “Welcome Robin may enjoy eating them, however for my part I want something smaller and daintier, like young grasshoppers, tender young beetles, small caterpillars, bugs and spiders.”

Peter had to turn his head aside to hide the wry face he just had to make at the mention of such things as food. “Is that all Welcome Robin eats?” he asked innocently.

“I should say not,” laughed Jenny. “He eats a lot of other kinds of worms, and he just dearly loves fruit like strawberries and cherries and all sorts of small berries. And by the way, I must mention, Welcome is a fine singer too.”

Peter nodded.

“Well, I can’t stop here talking any longer,” said Jenny. “However, I will tell you a secret before I go, Peter, if you’ll promise not to tell.”

Of course Peter promised, and Jenny leaned so far down that Peter wondered how she could keep from falling as she whispered, “I’ve got seven eggs in my nest, so if you don’t see much of me for the next week or more, you’ll know why. I’ve just got to sit on those eggs and keep them warm.”


Wiggle Worm aka bird food and soil sifters

Visit P.L.A.Y. Pinterest BIRD Board to see the Wiggle Worm in action HERE!


P.L.A.Y. in Place Projects


Try these activities to extend your bird story adventures:

  • Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – ALL ABOUT BIRDS –  American Robin
  • Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – ALL ABOUT BIRDS –  Eastern Bluebird
  • Nature journal coloring pages at Cornell Common Feeder Birds FREE American Robin page W51.
  • Q/A –Does the Robin begin to sing as soon as it comes North? At what time of day does the Robin sing? Is it likely to sing before a rain? How many songs does it sing?
  • Q/A – Does a Robin run or walk or hop? Does the Robin really hear earthworms?
  • Q/A – Can you describe the Bluebirds song? Does it sing all summer? Where do Bluebirds spend the winter?
  • Some of these questions have been inspired by or quoted from the Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock. More about the Robin and Bluebird on pages 57-65 of this classic offered FREE online HERE.

  • Fifty Favorite Birds Coloring Book by Lisa Bonforte offers pages for both the Robin (36) and the Bluebird (4). Colored pencil use recommended

  • Audubon’s Birds of America Coloring Book by Paul E. Kennedy also offers pages for both the Eastern Bluebird (3) and an American Robin (33). Colored pencil use recommended.

*Both of these coloring books are inexpensive, easy to find, and excellent companions to this bird story series.


Source for Chapter 5: Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess

P.L.A.Y. has provided a new online version of all 45 chapters of this updated and annotated 100+ year old public domain classic to:

  • be suitable for the 21st century family by having the Thornton Burgess woodland characters evolve to model mindfulness and loving kindness
  • highlight and bring awareness to the New England nature settings and offer an opportunity to learn more about birds and other woodland animals through this story adventure
  • create story extension moments through P.L.A.Y. suggested activities and investigations for making new nature connections generated by the reader’s own curiosity
  • encourage families to keep their own nature notebooks for drawing, writing, painting, and recording their own local daily outdoor P.L.A.Y. adventures

Feathered Friend BONUS!


American Robin

“When our American Robin comes out of the turquoise blue egg that his devoted mother has warmed into life, he usually finds three or four baby brothers and sisters huddled within the grassy cradle. In April, both parents worked hard to prepare this home for them. Having brought coarse grasses, roots, and a few leaves or weed stalks for the foundation, and pellets of mud in their bills for the inner walls (which they cleverly managed to smooth into a bowl shape without a mason’s trowel), and fine grasses for the lining of the nest, they saddled it on to the limb of an old apple tree. Robins prefer low-branching orchard or shade trees near our homes to the tall, straight shafts of the forest. Some have the courage to build among the vines or under the shelter of our piazzas. I know a pair of robins that reared a brood in a little clipped bay tree in a tub next to a front door, where people passed in and out continually.

And suppose your appetite were so large that you were compelled to eat more than your weight of food every day, and suppose you had three or four brothers and sisters, just your own size, and just as ravenously hungry. These are the conditions in every normal robin family, so you can easily imagine how hard the father and mother birds must work to keep their fledglings’ crops filled. No wonder robins like to live near our homes where the enriched land contains many fat grubs, and the smooth lawns, that they run across so lightly, make hunting for earth worms comparatively easy. It is estimated that about fourteen feet of worms (if placed end to end) are drawn out of the ground daily by a pair of robins with a nest full of babies to feed.” ~Birds Every Child Should Know by Neltje Blanchan Copyright 1907

Bluebirds

“Young bluebirds are far less wild and noisy than robins, however their very sharp little claws discourage handling. These pointed hooks on the ends of their toes help them to climb out of the tree hollow, that is their natural home, into the big world that their presence makes so cheerful.

Bluebirds hunt for a cavity in a fence rail, or a hole in some old tree, preferably in the orchard, shortly after their arrival, and proceed to line it with grass. From three to six pale blue eggs are laid. At first the babies are blind, helpless, and almost naked. Then they grow a suit of dark feathers with speckled, thrush-like vests similar to their cousin’s, the baby robin’s; and it is not until they are able to fly that the lovely deep blue shade gradually appears on their grayish upper parts. Then their throat, breast, and sides turn rusty red. While creatures are helpless, a prey for any enemy to pounce upon, Nature does not dress them conspicuously, you may be sure. Adult birds, that are able to look out for themselves, may be very gaily dressed, however their children must wear somber clothes until they grow strong and wise.” ~Birds Every Child Should Know by Neltje Blanchan Copyright 1907


P.L.A.Y. + Pass it on!

COVID-19 + Homeschooling – Special Edition Part 2

Painting en plein air (aka outdoors)


P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan


Still trying to find a rhythm for your days while facing the uncertainty of how long the kiddos will be “schooling at home”?

P.L.A.Y. has a day-to-day plan that is truly flexible and can be done in place while you all stay safely at home indoors as well as right out your back door in your own yard.

Remember learning happens all the time especially when we are engaged, curious, and approach with a sense of P.L.A.Y.

*Sign up on the side bar with your email to receive these daily P.L.A.Y. posts and activities OR check back OFTEN!


Looking for oodles of ideas on how to spend your days at home as a family working and P.L.A.Y.ing?

Read this online review series I created based on Laura Grace Weldon’s book:

Free Range Learning: How Homeschooling Changes Everything

— AND READ BELOW FOR MORE WAYS TO PLAN YOUR DAYS —


Here’s the Weekly Plan:

Monday – Nature Alliteration Adventure + Nature Journaling

Tuesday – Bird BOOK LOOK with a new story chapter and related online resources + activities/projects

Wednesday – Nature Alliteration Adventure + Nature Journaling

Thursday – Bird BOOK LOOK with a new story chapter and related online resources + activities/projects

Friday – Nature Alliteration Adventure + Nature Journaling

Saturday – Potluck P.L.A.Y. Pick (soooooo many options – you decide!)

Sunday – P.L.A.Y.  in Place with a Plan = Many topics showcased including A Family Gardening Series


Nature Journaling is for All Ages

Nature Journal – Spring Flowers


Here are some general examples of flexible daily plans that can be rearranged to suit your family while staying in place (appropriately apply to various ages and stages):

MONDAY 

MORNING

  • Breakfast & clean-up
  • Chores Together (care for pets/make bed/brush teeth/sort laundry/etc.)
  • Music & Movement (sing, dance, play instrument, yoga, etc.)
  • Building Projects (Legos, cardboard box forts, imagination & creativity engagement)
  • Read Anything! (solo, 1:1, together)
  • Hand Work (knitting, weaving, sewing, jewelry making, drawing, etc.) while listening to audio book recording

NOON

  • Kitchen Food Prep Helpers
  • Lunch & clean-up
  • Story Time (audio book or solo reading or together)
  • Rest & Regroup Quiet Time
  • Outdoor walk with today’s Nature Alliteration Adventures
  • Indoors/Outdoors write and draw in your journal to capture your nature adventures

NIGHT

  • Kitchen Food Prep Helpers
  • Supper & clean up together
  • Bed Time Routines (bath/teeth/pjs)
  • More short stories or ongoing chapter book or make up an ongoing story to add to each night!

Tuesday

MORNING

  • Chores Together (make bed/brush teeth/care for pets/sort laundry/etc.)
  • Breakfast & clean-up
  • Workbooks or appropriate online Screen Time work
  • Arts & Crafts project or Hobbies

NOON

  • Kitchen Food Prep Helpers
  • Eat lunch & clean-up
  • Stroll/jog/bike neighborhood and say hello to neighbors from a distance
  • Rest & Regroup Quiet Time
  • Bird BOOK LOOK next chapter and related activities and online resources

NIGHT

  • Kitchen Food Prep Helpers
  • Supper & clean up together
  • Family Games
  • Bed Time Routines (bath/teeth/pjs)
  • More short stories or ongoing chapter book or make up an ongoing story to add to each night!

*Adapt this to suit your family, all ages and stages, especially during this time of transition.


Still looking for more ideas on how to spend your days at home as a family working and P.L.A.Y.ing?

Read this online review series I created based on Laura Grace Weldon’s book Free Range Learning: How Homeschooling Changes Everything


Remember, it is more important to stay connected to one another than to “get it right”.

Tomorrow’s another day with new opportunities to try-try-again! 🙂

Plenty of hugs works wonders!


Please contact Karen@passionatelearningallyear.com with your questions and for parenting support during these challenging times.

You don’t have to do this alone. ❤ ❤ ❤

Sending a smile to help light the way,

Karen 🙂


FYI – Visit the first post in this special series at COVID-19 + Homeschooling – Special Series Part 1


P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan


COVID-19 + Homeschooling – Special Edition Part 1

You Have All You Need – Families Finding Peace During Challenging Times

Wisdom from a 20+ year veteran Stay-at-home-Unschooling Mama!

Curious Capkins ready to P.L.A.Y.!

If you are like so many of us and have your entire family at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic and you are wondering how in the world you are going to get through this time together know that you probably have on hand all that you need to keep everyone sane, engaged, and “homeschooled”.

Also know up front that you do not have to recreate the school environment (aka “School at Home”).

Trust me, after having taught in the elementary schools for years and then homeschooling for decades all you really need is to be present and focus on the health and well being of your family including priorities like sleep, exercise, and healthy foods. The rest will follow naturally with a few extra bonus suggestions from P.L.A.Y. below, and in future posts, to help get you started!


No Purchases Required = All Absolutely FREE!!!

The content on this website is FREE and available for ALL to use.

 You are also welcome to contact me directly HERE by email or HERE by snail mail as I love to answer questions and provide support for parents as well as receive kiddo art work+letters and will write back! FYI – Our internet is slow up in this neck-of-the-woods so my e-response may be slightly delayed.


Here’s a few suggestions to get you started for calming practices during chaotic times:

 

  • Creating a rhythm to your days is key to calm so family members of all ages have a sense of what to expect.

 

  • Simply displaying a sequence of sticky note squares on the bathroom mirror or kitchen cabinets with things like “breakfast”, “story”,”tidy-up”, “screen time”, “crafting”, “outdoor play”, “puzzles”, “care for pets”, etc. will work nicely to give a flow to your day and can be rotated throughout the week for flexibility. A specific chart with exact times isn’t required or necessary for most households – however you decide what matches for you especially if working from home is being combined with kiddo care.

 

  • Encourage ALL family members to make additional sticky note squares with activities and projects they would like to do AT HOME and weave them into the plans. They will feel more included and empowered and yes even your 2 year old can have a voice in this! Think things like building challenges – legos, cardboard boxes, etc. or 5 minute silly singing serenades to break up the day.

 

  • Communicate clearly each day that you are all in this together and in order to meet family expectations everyone has to be open and honest with what they understand will be happening in the days ahead. When things do change, as they seem to be rapidly overnight, be forthcoming with new news and course correct together.

 

  •  Be a super strength spotter by being open to new possibilities and opportunities to connect and truly see what makes your family members tick. If one family member has a keen ability to bring humor and levity to situations ask them to put their super powers to use and generate creative ideas to keep the household morale going (ex. a joke served up at every meal time). If another family member has great empathy and compassion skills perhaps they could be creating cards to mail loved ones or posting notes within the house that let everyone know they are loved and thought of too.

❤ ❤ ❤

Special Edition Part 2 of COVID-19 + “Schooling at Home”

or as I like to call it

P.L.A.Y. in Place with a Plan!

Tried and true golden nuggets and silver lining sparkles arriving by blog post HERE with more practical pointers for how to fill your days at HOME and outdoors (with required physical distancing included).

❤ ❤ ❤

Stay tuned, stay home, and stay safe everyone.

Know that how you act and respond today will have a positive ripple effect in your home, in your community, and make all the difference in the outcome of this current worldwide challenge.

❤ ❤ ❤

And if you have found this helpful please pass P.L.A.Y. forward.

We are ALL in this together.

Sending much love, e-hugs, and even smiles to help light the way,

Karen 🙂 ❤ ❤ ❤