Nature’s *P.L.A.Y.ground* is a Feast for Your Senses Throughout the Seasons


Let’s go P.L.A.Y. in nature’s playground and restore our sense of calm through connection to the great outdoors and engaging in curiosity together.


These are some of the top “sense-sational” experiences I’ve had P.L.A.Y.ing in 2020:

*Hearing the buzzing bees while soaking up the warm sunshine on my skin and taking in the scent of summer in bloom in the butterfly garden.

*Listening to the babbling brook as it cascades down the rocky pathway.

*Hearing the birds singing an early morning wake-up call and the owl’s calling out to one another as dusk sets in to say goodnight.

*Watching the young goat kids, only a few months old, butting heads and frolicking about or cuddling one of these newborn cuties up close.

*Feeling the warm sunshine on my back as I P.L.A.Y.ed pick-up-sticks in early spring to create a brush pile.

*Seeing the ducks peeking out between the grasses in the meadow as they gobble up grubs.

*Watching the clouds sail by and a storm roll in.

*Tasting the delicious newly ripened apples in the orchard and the last fresh greens from the gardens.

*Feeling the cold on my lips while tasting the sweet local maple syrup on freshly fallen snow.

*Smelling the apple wood scented smoke outdoors on a winter’s eve from a nearby home burning a fire in a wood stove.

*Breathing in the crisp cold air while walking in the bright light and shadows created under a full moon on a winter’s night.


Nature Noticing is for EVERYONE!


No special equipment or experience is required!

Just pack your senses (+Capkin),

step outdoors,

and

soon the smiles will appear!

🙂

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Dog, kids, partner, neighbor, friends, or solo – nature P.L.A.Y. is for ALL!

Time to step out your door and experience the magic that nature has in store for you and your family TODAY!

Bird BOOK LOOK – Chapter 45 – Northern Goshawk + Great Horned Owl


Missed Chapter 1? Begin HERE



CHAPTER 45 – Peter Sees Two Feathered Hunters


While it is true that Peter Rabbit likes winter, it is also true that life is not easy for him that season. In the first place he has to travel about a great deal to get sufficient food, and that means that he must run more risks. There isn’t a minute of day or night that he is outside of the dear Old Briar-patch when he can afford not to watch and listen for danger. You see, at this season of the year, Reddy Fox often finds it difficult to get a good meal. He is hungry most of the time, and he is forever hunting for Peter Rabbit. With snow on the ground and no leaves on the bushes and young trees, it is not easy for Peter to hide. So, as he travels about, the thought of Reddy Fox is always in his mind.

However, there are others whom Peter fears even more, and these wear feathers instead of fur coats. One of these is Terror the Goshawk. Peter is not alone in his fear of Terror. There is not one among his feathered friends who will not shiver at the mention of Terror’s name. Peter will not soon forget the day he discovered that Terror had come down from the Far North, and was likely to stay for the rest of the winter. Peter went hungry all the rest of that day.

You see it was this way: Peter had gone over to the Green Forest very early that morning in the hope of getting breakfast in a certain swamp. He was hopping along, lipperty-lipperty-lip, with his thoughts chiefly on that breakfast he hoped to get, and at the same time with ears and eyes alert for possible danger, when a strange feeling swept over him. It was a feeling that great danger was very near, though he saw nothing and heard nothing to indicate it. It was just a feeling, that was all.

Now Peter has learned that the wise thing to do when one has such a feeling as that is to seek safety first and investigate afterwards. At the instant he felt that strange feeling of fear he was passing a certain big, hollow log. Without really knowing why he did it, he dived into that hollow log, and even as he did so there was the sharp swish of great wings. Terror the Goshawk had missed catching Peter by a fraction of a second.


Hollowed out log for hiding.


With his heart thumping as if it were trying to pound its way through his ribs, Peter peeped out of that hollow log. Terror had alighted on a tall stump only a few feet away. To Peter in his fright he seemed the biggest bird he ever had seen. Of course he wasn’t. Actually he was very near the same size as Redtail the Hawk, whom Peter knew well.

His back was bluish. His head seemed almost black. Over and behind each eye was a white line. Underneath he was beautifully marked with wavy bars of gray and white. On his tail were four dark bands. And Peter could see the eyes that were fixed on the entrance to that hollow log. Peter shivered as if with a cold chill.

“I hope,” thought Peter, “that Mr. and Mrs. Grouse are nowhere about.” You see he knew that there is no one that Terror would rather catch than a member of the Grouse family.

Terror did not sit on that stump long. He knew that Peter was not likely to come out in a hurry. Presently he flew away, and Peter suspected from the direction in which he was headed that Terror was going over to visit Farmer Brown’s hen yard. Of all the members of the Hawk family there is none more bold than Terror the Goshawk. He would not hesitate to seize a hen from almost beneath Farmer Brown’s nose. He is well named, for the mere suspicion that he is anywhere about strikes terror to the heart of all the furred and feathered folks. He is so swift of wing that few can escape him.


Barnyard hen is dinner for a Goshawk.


All that day Peter remained hidden in that hollow log. He did not dare put foot outside until the Dark Shadows began to creep through the Green Forest. Then he knew that there was nothing more to fear from Terror the Goshawk, for he hunts only by day. Once more Peter’s thoughts were chiefly of his stomach, for it was very, very empty.

However, it was not intended that Peter should fill his stomach at once. He had gone only a little way when from just ahead of him the silence of the early evening was broken by a terrifying sound “Whooo-hoo-hoo, whooo-hoo!” It was so sudden that Peter had all he could do to keep from jumping and running for dear life. He knew that voice and he knew, too, that safety lay in keeping perfectly still. So with his heart thumping madly, as when he had escaped from Terror that morning, Peter sat as still as if he could not move.

It was the hunting call of Hooty the Great Horned Owl, and it had been intended to frighten some one into jumping and running, or at least into moving ever so little. Peter knew all about that trick of Hooty’s. He knew that in all the Green Forest there are no ears so wonderful as those of Hooty the Owl, and that the instant he had uttered that hunting call he had strained those wonderful ears to catch the faintest sound which some startled little sleeper of the night might make. The rustle of a leaf would be enough to bring Hooty to the spot on his great silent wings, and then his yellow eyes, which are made for seeing in the dusk, would find his prey.

So Peter sat still, fearful that the very thumping of his heart might reach those wonderful ears. Again that terrible hunting cry rang out, and again Peter had all he could do to keep from jumping. He did not jump though, and a few minutes later, as he sat staring at a certain tall, dead stub of a tree, wondering just where Hooty was, the top of that stub seemed to break off, and a great, broad winged bird flew away soundlessly like a drifting shadow. It was Hooty himself. Sitting perfectly straight on the top of that tall, dead stub he had seemed a part of it. Peter waited some time before he ventured to move. Finally he heard Hooty’s hunting call in a distant part of the Green Forest, and knew that it was safe for him to once more think of his empty stomach.


Icy babbling brook in winter


Later in the winter while the snow still lay in the Green Forest, and the ice still bound the Laughing Brook, Peter made a surprising discovery. He was over in a certain lonely part of the Green Forest when he happened to remember that near there was an old nest which had once belonged to Redtail the Hawk. Out of idle curiosity Peter ran over for a look at that old nest. Imagine how surprised he was when just as he came within sight of it, he saw a great bird just settling down on it. Peter’s heart jumped right up in his throat. At least that is the way it seemed, for he recognized Mrs. Hooty.

Of course Peter stopped right where he was and took the greatest care not to move or make a sound. Presently Hooty himself appeared and perched in a tree near at hand. Peter has seen Hooty many times before, always as a great, drifting shadow in the moonlight. Now he could see him clearly. As he sat bolt upright he seemed to be of the same height as Terror the Goshawk, although with a very much bigger body. If Peter had known it, his appearance of great size was largely due to the fluffy feathers in which Hooty was clothed. Like his small cousin, Spooky the Screech Owl, Hooty seemed to have no neck at all. He looked as if his great head was set directly on his shoulders. From each side of his head two great tufts of feathers stood out like ears or horns. His bill was sharply hooked. He was dressed all in reddish-brown with little buff and black markings, and on his throat was a white patch. His legs were feathered, and so were his feet clear to the great claws.

Above all else it was on the great, round, yellow eyes that Peter kept his own eyes. He had always thought of Hooty as being able to see only in the dusk of evening or on moonlight nights, and somehow he had a feeling that even now in broad daylight Hooty could see perfectly well, and he was quite right.

For a long time Peter sat there without moving. He dared not do anything else. After he had recovered from his first fright he began to wonder what Hooty and Mrs. Owl were doing at that old nest. His curiosity was aroused. He felt that he simply must find out. By and by Hooty flew away. Very carefully, so as not to attract the attention of Mrs. Owl. Peter went back the way he had come. When he was far enough away to feel reasonably safe, he scampered as fast as ever he could. He wanted to get away from that place, and he wanted to find some one of whom he could ask questions.

Presently he met his cousin, Jumper the Hare, and at once in a most excited manner told him all he had seen.

Jumper listened until Peter was through. “If you’ll take my advice,” he said, “you’ll keep away from that part of the Green Forest, Cousin Peter. From what you tell me it is quite clear to me that the Owl Family have begun nesting.”

“Nesting!” exclaimed Peter. “Nesting! Why, gentle Mistress Spring will not get here for a month yet!”


Winter Wonderland


“Hooty the Great Horned Owl doesn’t wait for Mistress Spring,” said Jumper. “He and Mrs. Owl believe in getting household cares out of the way early. Along about this time of year they hunt up an old nest of Redtail the Hawk or Clever the Crow or Chatterer the Red Squirrel, for they do not build a nest themselves. Then Mrs. Owl lays her eggs while there is still snow and ice. Why their youngsters don’t catch their death from cold when they hatch out is more than I can say. They simply don’t. I’m sorry to hear that the Owl Family have a nest here this year. It means a bad time for a lot of little folks in feathers and fur. I certainly shall keep away in from that part of the Green Forest, and I advise you to.”

Peter said that he certainly should, and then started on for the dear Old Briar-patch to think things over. The discovery that already the nesting season of a new year had begun turned Peter’s thoughts towards the coming of sweet Mistress Spring and the return of his many feathered friends who had left for the far away South so long before. A great longing to hear the voices of Welcome Robin and Winsome Bluebird and Little Friend the Song Sparrow swept over him, and a still greater longing for a bit of friendly chatting with Jenny Wren. In the past year he had learned so much about his feathered neighbors, and there were still so many things he wanted to know, things Jenny Wren and others could tell him. He couldn’t wait to begin the year anew with more questions and curiosity about his feathered friends and all of the creatures in the great Green Forest, and beyond.



P.L.A.Y. in Place Projects


Try these activities to extend your bird story adventures:


Source: Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess

P.L.A.Y. has provided a new online version of all 45 chapters of this updated and annotated 100+ year old public domain classic to:

  • be suitable for the 21st century family by having the Thornton Burgess woodland characters evolve to model mindfulness and loving kindness
  • highlight and bring awareness to the New England nature settings and offer an opportunity to learn more about birds and other woodland animals through this story adventure
  • create story extension moments through P.L.A.Y. suggested activities and investigations for making new nature connections generated by the reader’s own curiosity
  • encourage families to keep their own nature notebooks for drawing, writing, painting, and recording their own local daily outdoor P.L.A.Y. adventures.

P.L.A.Y. Time – Pass it on!

Bird BOOK LOOK – Chapter 42 – Eastern Screech Owl


Missed Chapter 1? Begin HERE



CHAPTER 42 – Peter Learns Something About Spooky


Peter Rabbit likes winter. At least he doesn’t mind it so very much, even though he has to really work for a living. Perhaps it is a good thing that he does, for he might grow too fat to keep out of the way of Reddy Fox. You see when the snow is deep Peter is forced to eat whatever he can, and very often there isn’t much of anything for him except the bark of young trees. It is at such times that Peter gets into mischief, for there is no bark he likes better than that of young fruit trees. Now you know what happens when the bark is taken off all the way around the trunk of a tree. That tree dies. It dies for the simple reason that it is up the inner layer of bark that the life giving sap travels in the spring and summer. Of course, when a strip of bark has been taken off all the way around near the base of a tree, the sap cannot go up and the tree must die.

Now up near the Old Orchard Farmer Brown had set out a young orchard. Peter knew all about that young orchard, for he had visited it many times in the summer. Then there had been plenty of sweet clover and other green things to eat, and Peter had never been so much as tempted to sample the bark of those young trees. Now things were very different, and it was very seldom that Peter knew what it was to have a full stomach. He kept thinking of that young orchard. He knew that if he were wise he would keep away from there. And the more he thought of it the more it seemed to him that he just must have some of that tender young bark. So just at dusk one evening, Peter started for the young orchard.


Winter in the Old Orchard and Green Forest with a cloak of white.


Peter got there safely and his eyes sparkled as he hopped over to the nearest young tree. When he reached it, Peter had a dreadful disappointment. All around the trunk of that young tree was wire netting.

Peter couldn’t get even a nibble of that bark. He tried the next tree with no better result. Then he hurried on from tree to tree, always with the same result. You see Farmer Brown knew all about Peter’s liking for the bark of young fruit trees, and he had been wise enough to protect his young orchard.

At last Peter gave up and hopped over to the Old Orchard. As he passed a certain big tree he was startled by a voice. “What’s the matter, Peter?” said the voice. “You don’t look happy.”


Screech Owl by Louis Agassiz Fuertes


Peter stopped short and stared up in the big apple tree. Look as he might he couldn’t see anybody. Of course there wasn’t a leaf on that tree, and he could see all through it. Peter blinked. He knew that had there been any one sitting on any one of those branches he couldn’t have helped seeing him.

“Don’t look so high, Peter,” said the voice with a chuckle. This time it sounded as if it came right out of the trunk of the tree. Peter stared at the trunk and then suddenly laughed right out. Just a few feet above the ground was a good sized hole in the tree, and poking his head out of it was a funny little fellow with big eyes and a hooked beak.

“You certainly did fool me that time, Spooky,” cried Peter. “I ought to have recognized your voice, and I didn’t.”

Spooky the Screech Owl, for that is who it was, came out of the hole in the tree and without a sound from his wings flew over and perched just above Peter’s head. He was a little fellow, not over eight inches high, and there was no mistaking the family to which he belonged. In fact he looked very much like a small copy of Hooty the Great Horned Owl, so much so that Peter felt a little cold shiver run over him, although he had nothing in the world to fear from Spooky.

His head seemed to be almost as big around as his body, and he seemed to leave no neck at all. He was dressed in bright reddish-brown, with little streaks and bars of black. Underneath he was whitish, with little streaks and bars of black and brown. On each side of his head was a tuft of feathers. They looked like ears and some people think they are ears although they are not. His eyes were round and yellow with a fierce hungry look in them. His bill was small and almost hidden among the feathers of his face, it was hooked just like the bill of Hooty. As he settled himself he turned his head around until he could look squarely behind him, then brought it back again so quickly that to Peter it looked as if it had gone clear around. You see Spooky’s eyes are fixed in their sockets and he cannot move them from side to side. He has to turn his whole head in order to see to one side or the other.

“You haven’t told me yet why you look so unhappy, Peter,” said Spooky.

“Isn’t an empty stomach enough to make any fellow unhappy?” replied Peter.

Spooky chuckled. “I’ve got an empty stomach myself, Peter,” he said, “and it isn’t making me unhappy. I have a feeling that somewhere there is a fat mouse waiting for me.”


Snow edged hole in a tree – perhaps a perch for an owl? Maybe!


Just then Peter remembered what Jenny Wren had told him early in the spring of how Spooky the Screech Owl lives all the year around in a hollow tree, and curiosity made him forget for the time being that he was hungry. “Did you live in that hole all summer, Spooky?” he asked.

Spooky nodded solemnly. “I’ve lived in that hollow summer and winter for three years,” said he.

Peter’s eyes opened very wide. “And till now I never even guessed it,” he exclaimed. “Did you raise a family there?”

“I certainly did,” replied Spooky. “Mrs. Screech Owl and I raised a family of four as fine looking youngsters as you ever have seen. They’ve gone out into the Great World to make their own living now. Two were dressed just like me and two were gray.”

“That’s funny,” Peter exclaimed.

“What’s funny?” Spooky said with suspicion.

“Why that all four were not dressed alike,” said Peter.

“Oh, there’s nothing funny about it,” replied Spooky, and snapped his bill sharply with a little cracking sound. “We Screech Owls believe in variety. Some of us are gray and some of us are reddish-brown.”

Peter nodded as if he quite understood, although he couldn’t understand at all. “I’m ever so pleased to find you living here,” he said politely. “You see, in winter the Old Orchard is rather a lonely place. I don’t see how you get enough to eat when there are so few birds about.”

“Birds!” snapped Spooky. “What have birds to do with it?”

“Why, don’t you live on birds?” asked Peter innocently.

“I should say not. I guess I would starve if I depended on birds for my daily food,” responded Spooky. “I catch a Sparrow now and then, to be sure, usually it is a House Sparrow. However, I live mostly on mice and shrews in winter and in summer I eat a lot of grasshoppers and other insects. If it wasn’t for me and my relatives I guess mice would soon over run the Great World. Farmer Brown ought to be glad I’ve come to live in the Old Orchard and I guess he is, for Farmer Brown’s boy knows all about this house of mine and never disturbs me. Now if you’ll excuse me I think I’ll fly over to Farmer Brown’s young orchard. I ought to find a fat mouse or two trying to get some of the bark from those young trees.”

“Hah!” exclaimed Peter. “They can try all they want to, and they still won’t get any; I can tell you that.”

Spooky’s round yellow eyes twinkled. “It must be you have been trying to get some of that bark yourself,” he said.

Spooky once more chuckled as he spread his wings and flew away so soundlessly that he seemed more like a drifting shadow than a bird. Then Peter started for a certain swamp he knew of where he would be sure to find enough bark to stay his appetite.


P.L.A.Y. in Place Projects


Try these activities to extend your bird story adventures:

  • Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – ALL ABOUT BIRDS –  Eastern Screech Owl
  • Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – ALL ABOUT BIRDS –  Eastern Screech Owl Camouflage
  • Visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology – K-12 Education – Dissecting an Owl Pellet
  • Q/A –Questions with answers to keep this conversation going are available for Screech Owl (p. 100-104) in the Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock offered FREE online HERE.

Source: Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess

P.L.A.Y. has provided a new online version of all 45 chapters of this updated and annotated 100+ year old public domain classic to:

  • be suitable for the 21st century family by having the Thornton Burgess woodland characters evolve to model mindfulness and loving kindness
  • highlight and bring awareness to the New England nature settings and offer an opportunity to learn more about birds and other woodland animals through this story adventure
  • create story extension moments through P.L.A.Y. suggested activities and investigations for making new nature connections generated by the reader’s own curiosity
  • encourage families to keep their own nature notebooks for drawing, writing, painting, and recording their own local daily outdoor P.L.A.Y. adventures.

P.L.A.Y. Time – Pass it on!

P.L.A.Y. Project: Snowflakes + Cool Crystals #7


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Known: These crystals formed just outside a crevice in a tree.

Unknown: I’m guessing the breath and body heat of a critter that lives inside the tree helped generate the right conditions for these cool crystals to form.


Below are multiple views of this P.L.A.Y. discovery.



Thank YOU for supporting P.L.A.Y. projects <HERE>


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P.L.A.Y. Project: Snowflakes + Cool Crystals #6


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Visit Pinterest <here> to see the video of this frosty morning find!



A Spectacular Collection of Cool Crystals in this Winter Wonderland Scene!

Fabulous Frost Finds look great close-up and Faraway!


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Thank YOU for supporting P.L.A.Y. <HERE>


P.L.A.Y. Project: Snowflakes + Cool Crystals #5


Welcome to my P.L.A.Y. project:

Snowflakes & Cool Crystals


First post in this series is <HERE>.


I continue to P.L.A.Y. in nature whenever the “white stuff” appears out my window.

Here are more observations and snapshots from my front steps:

Sometimes there is such diversity all within the same storm in terms of shape, size, and design. I love looking these up in my snowflake field guide (below).

Surprise! Look how itty-bitty they can be!

I’ve also enjoyed expanding my search and exploration from snowflakes to also revisiting my favorite cool crystal locations down at the brook and river.

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I continue to use Ken Libbrecht’s snowflakes field guide to have fun going deeper into this P.L.A.Y. project by looking up specific shapes and terms for different snowflakes and crystals.

It is all still too new for me to retain much of this language yet so for now it is just enjoyable to keep looking up new flakes as they fall!


Stay tuned for more Project Snowflake + Cool Crystal updates!


Curious Capkins love getting outdoors to P.L.A.Y. with you in all seasons and all weather!

Kiddos and folks of all ages, throw on your snow suit and make tracks to your favorite nature spot and check out those snowflakes!

Ready? Let’s go!

❤ ❤ ❤

 

P.L.A.Y. Project: Snowflakes + Cool Crystals #4


Welcome to my P.L.A.Y. project:

Snowflakes & Cool Crystals


First post in this series is <HERE>.


I continue to P.L.A.Y. in nature whenever the “white stuff” appears out my window.

More observations and snapshots from my front steps as I continue to work on getting “clearer close-ups”:

Quite often the snowflakes do not have their 6 sides intact by the time they reach the ground and yet they are still simply beautiful!

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Join me in this P.L.A.Y. project by diving deeper into the snowdrifts of snowflake books including this biography designed to hold the attention of a mature reader and yet some of the fun facts can be pulled out to share around the dinner table and engage all with a lead in of “Did you know?”.

The Snowflake Man: A Biography of Wilson A. Bentley

by Duncan C. Blanchard

Duncan Blanchard spent decades of his time chasing down the ghost of Wilson Bentley as he was fascinated by his work in water wonders of the atmosphere – both raindrops, dew, clouds and frost, and of course snowflakes. Duncan himself was an atmospheric scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, MA in the 1960’s  and had an appreciation for the work Bentley had done in the late 1800’s. After countless hours interviewing folks, researching in libraries, and putting together the pieces of this interesting biographical account Duncan finely published his book in 1998. *Over 200 pages of text, sources, and photos are included.


Stay tuned for more Project Snowflake + Cool Crystal updates!


Curious Capkins love getting outdoors to P.L.A.Y. with you in all seasons and all weather!

Kiddos and folks of all ages, throw on your snow suit and make tracks to your favorite nature spot and check out those snowflakes!

Ready? Let’s go!

❤ ❤ ❤

Beaver BOOK LOOK 17 (+videos) The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver (Annotated) by Karen L. Willard


Join this P.L.A.Y. adventure by purchasing HERE!


The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver (Annotated):

A P.L.A.Y. Nature Story Activity Book

by Karen L. Willard

Learn all about amazing beaver behaviors in this P.L.A.Y.-filled nature story activity book based on the Thornton Burgess animal adventure series.


Bonus P.L.A.Y. Beaver VIDEO Series

– Watch on PINTEREST


I SAW PADDY THE BEAVER!

Oh my goodness! Today was the day! In the midst of a grey sloppy walk I saw Paddy the Beaver and boy was he CUTE!

He was working just below the dam and sat about 20 inches tall with his good size tail as his prop. He looked to be a 2-3 year old juvenile at about 40lbs tops all sopping wet.

He was 6 ft away from me down in the beaver canal and immediately jumped from below the dam up and over the layered logs and dove directly into the water swimming diagonally straight to the entrance of what I can now confirm is his lodge.

It all happened so fast (therefore no photos) and yet it was a spectacular site none-the-less!

I called out to him as I left letting him know I was so glad to finally meet him, even if briefly!

Yay, Paddy!


Video 32 <HERE>

 Timberrrrrrr! Paddy the Beaver’s work includes a tricky balancing act!


Visit these P.L.A.Y. video pins on PINTEREST to see updates of actual local beaver activity similar to Paddy’s adventures and stay tuned for more in this series.


This P.L.A.Y. guide book provides hours of entertainment as a read aloud to share with the whole family, a community group, in a classroom, or to simply curl up with solo.

The BONUS P.L.A.Y. guide pages include opportunities to:

  • illustrate each chapter
  • photos shared of real beaver activity
  • tree themed and blank nature journaling pages
  • recommended resources and so much more

 


Join the P.L.A.Y. adventures and share them with family and friends!

Purchase your P.L.A.Y. nature story books and adventure guides HERE.

Beaver BOOK LOOK 16 (+videos) The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver (Annotated) by Karen L. Willard


Join this P.L.A.Y. adventure by purchasing HERE!


The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver (Annotated):

A P.L.A.Y. Nature Story Activity Book

by Karen L. Willard

Learn all about amazing beaver behaviors in this P.L.A.Y.-filled nature story activity book based on the Thornton Burgess animal adventure series.


Bonus P.L.A.Y. Beaver VIDEO Series

– Watch on PINTEREST


Video 31 <HERE>

Curious if a beaver lodge has emerged along the beaver canal as a 3ft tall stick and mud pile now sits above the water line.

Melting ice in the beaver canal due to warm days with over 33 trees down to date and some floating pieces in the water. Paddy’s still busy!


Visit these P.L.A.Y. video pins on PINTEREST to see updates of actual local beaver activity similar to Paddy’s adventures and stay tuned for more in this series.


This P.L.A.Y. guide book provides hours of entertainment as a read aloud to share with the whole family, a community group, in a classroom, or to simply curl up with solo.

The BONUS P.L.A.Y. guide pages include opportunities to:

  • illustrate each chapter
  • photos shared of real beaver activity
  • tree themed and blank nature journaling pages
  • recommended resources and so much more

 


Join the P.L.A.Y. adventures and share them with family and friends!

Purchase your P.L.A.Y. nature story books and adventure guides HERE.

P.L.A.Y. Project: Snowflakes + Cool Crystals #3


Welcome to my P.L.A.Y. project:

Snowflakes & Cool Crystals


First post in this series is <HERE>.


I continue to P.L.A.Y. in nature whenever the “white stuff” appears out my window.

Visit  PINTEREST <here> to watch a magical moment as two snowflakes melt into one natural art piece as a beautiful black silhouette.

The snow “storms” that are sporadic and not too heavy seem to produce the best close-up snowflake snapshots. This is a wide view of how the meadow looks after this type of storm, covered in snowflakes, as the blue sky reappears.

Visit PINTEREST <here> to watch nature’s full effect including a little “snow spinner” with the wind whipping up in the meadow.

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Engaging with this project continues to feel P.L.A.Y.-filled , both a positive challenge and like a work in progress, so I will forge ahead with rereading the books below while looking for more details and also looking for outdoor opportunities to test out new techniques.

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Join me in this P.L.A.Y. project by reading Ken Libbrecht’s snowflake books:


Stay tuned for more Project Snowflake + Cool Crystal updates!


Curious Capkins love getting outdoors to P.L.A.Y. with you in all seasons and all weather!

Folks of all ages, throw on your snow gear and make tracks to your favorite nature spot and check out those snowflakes!

Ready? Let’s go!

❤ ❤ ❤